Course Descriptions

 

Combustion Theory and Applications in CFD

Lecturer: Prof. Heinz Pitsch, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Course Length: 15 hours (Mon – Fri)

Session: Morning Session

Objective: Fundamental knowledge in laminar and turbulent combustion and applications in CFD: laminar premixed and diffusion flame structure, flammability limits, introduction to turbulence, LES, introduction to turbulent combustion and modeling, regimes of premixed combustion, turbulent burning velocities, flamelet concept and its applications for nonpremixed turbulent combustion, CFD and numerical combustion with application to internal combustion engines and gas turbines.

Quantitative Laser Diagnostics for Combustion Chemistry and Propulsion

Lecturer: Prof. Ronald K. Hanson, Stanford University, USA
Course Length: 15 hours (Mon – Fri)

Session: Morning Session

Objective: Fundamentals of laser absorption and laser-induced fluorescence in gases, including molecular spectroscopy and photophysics. Basics of shock tubes as a primary tool for studying combustion chemistry, including recent advances. Example state-of-the-art applications of species-specific sensing for shock tube kinetics studies, and multi-parameter sensing in different types of propulsion flows and engines.

Combustion Chemistry

Lecturer: Prof. Michael J. Pilling, University of Leeds, UK
Course Length: 15 hours (Mon – Fri)

Session: Afternoon Session

Objective: The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of how rate coefficients and products of elementary reactions, of importance in combustion, are determined by experiment and by theory, and how they are incorporated in chemical mechanisms for use in combustion models. The course will cover aspects of experimental techniques, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics and theories of kinetics, including transition state and RRKM theories and master equation models. Some of the elementary reactions involved in hydrogen oxidation, in autoignition chemistry and in soot formation will be discussed in more detail.

Internal Combustion Engines

Course Length: 15 hours (Mon – Fri)

Session: Afternoon Session

Part I: Fundamentals and Performance Metrics

Lecturer: Prof. Rolf. Reitz, University of Wisconsin at Madison

Course Length: 9 hours (Mon - Wed)

Objective: Engine fundamentals and performance metrics, computer modeling supported by in-depth understanding of fundamental engine processes and detailed experiments in engine design optimization.

Part II: Perspectives of Future Engines and Fuels

Lecturer: Dr. Gautam Kalghatgi, Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia

Course Length: 6 hours (Thurs - Fri)

Objective: Broad perspectives on the future role of internal combustion engines in transportation; fuel effects and knock in S.I. engines; fuel effects in C.I. engines, deposits and fuel additives, implications for future fuels.

Advanced Topics in Propulsion

Course Length: 15 hours (Mon – Fri)

Session: Afternoon Session

Part I: Unsteady Combustor Processes

Lecturer: Timothy C. Lieuwen, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Course Length: 9 hours (Mon - Wed)

Objective: This course presents a unified treatment of the coupled combustion, acoustic, and fluid mechanic processes that control key unsteady combustion processes.  In many cases, combustion design is limited by combustion instabilities or combustion limit phenomenon, such as ignition or blowoff.  Content includes: acoustics of combustion systems, hydrodynamic stability of reacting flows and flame aerodynamics, flame stretch, flame extinction, edge flames, flame stability, and response of flames to flow disturbances.

Part II: Combustion of Energetic Materials

Lecturer: Prof. Richard A. Yetter, Pennsylvania State University, USA

Course Length: 6 hours (Thurs - Fri)

Objective: This course will cover fundamentals of energetic materials combustion, the classification of energetic materials, and application examples. The burning behavior, chemistry, and flame structure of solid propellants, as well as the ignition and combustion of particulate metals will be discussed. Future directions including the roles of self-assembly and additive manufacturing will be introduced.